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Google’s Project Glass Coming By End Of Year

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As we have been reporting, Google’s Project Glass is expected to be unveiled during the holiday season this year, to be sold by electronics retailers including Google’s very own upcoming stores. The headsets are currently only being offered to developers willing to pay $1500 a piece, but this price is expected to come down when released to the general public.

In the past week, various details about Glass have been revealed. On Wednesday, Google released a very cool new preview video about what we should expect to be able to do with these things. Today, a writer over at The Verge spent some time with a demo Glass headset and posted about his impressions. In the article, he describes that the headsets do not have any cellular connectivity themselves but need to be either tethered to a smartphone, or connect to a WiFi network to operate.

Now, this may not come as a shock, but it does imply a significant data and battery drain to your device. Interestingly, we’ve all heard that Google is looking to make big improvements in its battery technology, something they have hinted at including in the upcoming X phoneThe Verge does not reveal whether or not the glasses can be synced to a smartphone via Bluetooth, which would require less power consumption over a WiFi connection.

As we saw in the video on Wednesday, it looks as though one of the main features of Glass is its ability to take photos and videos. Apparently, when recording video, an LED light will switch on, much like what we are used to seeing on our computer webcams. As such, there doesn’t appear to be a way of recording video without others knowing and seeing what you are doing. Darn.

Also, not revealed in the video preview is how one goes about turning these things on and off. From what we have seen, one would assume the headset is always on, ready to act on a user’s voice commands. Not so according to the article at The Verge. To turn Glass on, the user will need to either tilt their head upwards towards the sky, or press a button located on the side of the headset.

It’s an interesting article, so I recommend you follow the source link to read it for yourselves. It definitely brings things into perspective, after having only learned about the project through Google’s promotional videos. Although the writer’s impressions definitely bring my expectations of Google Glass back down to earth, the technology still seems to me like something that can revolutionize our lives, much like what the smartphone has done in the past five years.

[The Verge]